Category Archives: Vaginismus

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month

In the United States, an estimated 80,720 new cases of gynecologic cancer will be diagnosed in 2009 and an estimated 28,120 deaths nationwide will be attributed to gynecologic cancer. These cancers affect the female reproductive system and include the cervix, endometrium, fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus and vagina.

In an effort to increase public awareness about gynecologic cancer, Cool Water Cones join other organizations nationwide to promote Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month in September.

Gynecologic cancer facts

* On average, every 6.4 minutes a woman in this country will be diagnosed with a cancer of the reproductive organs.

* All women over age 18 should have a yearly Pap test (also known as a Pap Smear) and pelvic exam to establish a pattern of gynecologic health.

UPMC developed a website of resource information for learning more about gynecologic cancer:

http://www.upmccancercenters.com/awareness/9gynecologic/

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Filed under dilator, female cancers, Gynecological Oncology, Menopause, vaginal dilator, Vaginismus

Why are vaginal dilators used in treating vaginismus?

Dilators are very helpful with certain parts of vaginismus treatment.

When used properly, vaginal dilators are very helpful with certain parts of vaginismus treatment. Vaginal Dilators can be very effective tools in helping to eliminate the PC muscle reflex, the underlying cause of vaginismus tightness, burning, and penetration difficulties. Dilators help enable women to have precise control over the size, speed, and angle of insertions and provide a substitute means to trigger the PC reflex in a sex-like context. Together with appropriate exercises, as women consciously and consistently squeeze and relax the PC muscles with dilator insertions, they learn how to override the involuntary muscle contractions that had previously caused tightness or closed the entrance to the vagina to sex. The process helps create new ‘muscle memories’. Through the proper use of dilators, women can more easily develop control over involuntary tightness and simultaneously desensitize their vaginal muscles, body and mind to the sensation of having something in their vagina. This is all done as transition preparation for inserting the “real thing” (i.e. the man’s penis) without pain or tightness. Together with appropriate exercises, they help women retrain their bodies to respond correctly to penetration and to transition to fully pain-free intercourse.

Note that there is more to treating vaginismus then simply inserting dilators. Contrary to popular believe, the focus of dilator use in treating vaginismus is not to ’stretch’ the vaginal tissues or vaginal opening, but rather to assist women to gain control of their pelvic floor. Women with penetration difficulties related to their vaginismus often mistakenly assume that dilators are used to stretch their vaginal opening so that it will be larger, when, in fact, their penetration problems relate to problems with involuntary tightness of the pelvic floor.

excerpted from: http://www.vaginismus.com

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Filed under dilator, Vaginismus